High gas prices and the convenience of home-working means some CEOs have not returned to the office full-time, raising concerns about the future of “the workplace.”

Research carried out by Marcum LLP and Hofstra University’s Frank G. Zarb School of Business shows fewer than half of the 254 mid-market bosses polled were working five days a week in the office.

Result showed 77 percent of bosses gave their staff the opportunity to work remotely for at least some of the week, and 87.5 percent said was likely to continue.

READ MORE: AMAZON CEO NAMES NEW HEAD FOR COMPANY’S TROUBLED RETAIL BUSINESS

Reduced COVID-19 transmission, cheaper expenses for office space and travel, and competition with businesses that offered remote work are a few of the benefits of accepting remote work.

Looking for a new job? Find the WhatJobs Career Advice Center here

The convenience, better productivity, and less stress were among the same motivators cited by CEOs who chose to continue working remotely.

Rising gas prices have also been a factor; according to CEOs, 41.7 percent of employees are reluctant to go back to work because of petrol prices.

The results provide more evidence in the ongoing debate over going back to work around the world, where some bosses, such as Tesla’s Elon Musk, are dead set on staff coming back full time.

Some experts saw a division between management and staff as 2022 approached. 76 percent of respondents to a 2021 survey by Slack’s Future Forum said they did not want to work in an office full-time.

According to a Yoh study conducted in March 2022, 62 percent of employees who are already working remotely stated they would prefer to maintain their existing arrangements over switching to hybrid or in-person employment.

READ MORE: “IF YOU WANT A CAREER, ENGAGE WITH THE REST OF US IN THE OFFICE” – JEFFRIES CEO WEIGHS IN ON REMOTE WORKING DEBATE

Data from a poll of IT and business decision-makers, which software company Foundry released last month, revealed that the majority of respondents saw hybrid or remote work as a “permanent” option for their firms.

And according to a Workhuman poll conducted in April that looked at the Human Workplace Index, 71 percent of workers who had to go back to work full-time approved of their employers’ choices.

Source: HRdive

Follow us on YouTube, Twitter, LinkedIn, and Facebook