Amazon may run out of warehouse staff by 2024, with the corporation burning through its entire warehouse crew annually due to its grueling schedules.

A document, first reported by Recode, includes the words: “If we continue business as usual, Amazon will deplete the available labor supply in the US network by 2024.”

The paper was internally published in 2021.

According to Recode, an Amazon official did not deny the validity of the video.

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The Inland Empire, California, an hour and a half east of Los Angeles, is predicted to have the most difficulty finding workers.

A two-hour drive away is 20 million prospective Amazon consumers.

The memo stated Jeff Bezos’ company may run out of new workers in the Inland Empire by the end of 2021 or 2022, despite the fact that warehouses in the Inland Empire continue to function and it is unclear what, if any, staffing challenges they are now facing.

Mesa, Arizona, may also run out of workers soon.

Figures reveal Amazon, which has become famous for the grueling, closely regulated working conditions imposed on warehouse employees, loses more people than it employs each year.

According to the research, Wilmington, Delaware and Memphis, Tennessee is also at risk of running out of employees. According to Amazon’s own figures, the corporation had a 12 percent turnover rate last year.

That indicates that during the course of the year, the number of employees who departed the business was equal to the total number of employees at the start of the year – plus an additional 23 percent.

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Many Amazon employees, particularly those in higher-level positions, stay for an extended period of time.

Others, though, arrive and depart within a year, increasing the attrition figure.

Amazon employs around a million people in the United States, including head office personnel, making it the second-largest private employer in the country, trailing only the 2.3 million-strong Walmart ‘family.’

Its attrition rate for the most prevalent positions at Amazon, warehouse work and transportation, is significantly over the national average. In 2019, the national average for warehouse and transportation attrition was 46%, rising to 59% in 2020.

Source: Silive.com

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