A lawsuit has been launched against a pharmaceutical giant claiming it rejected a vastly experienced member of staff in favor of someone younger and less qualified.

Novo Nordisk has been hit with a lawsuit from the EEOC for allegedly rejecting a lateral move for a 62-year-old employee because of her age and instead employing a less-qualified 33-year-old.

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The woman applied for and was interviewed for the same employment when it became available in another territory closer to where she lived.

Instead of hiring her, the employer chose someone 30 years younger from a different state.

The business conducted an internal investigation and discovered that the hiring manager violated Novo Nordisk’s anti-discrimination policy by selecting the younger candidate because he could fill the post “long-term.”

The lawsuit alleges that even after discovering the breach, the corporation refused to reassign the employee.

The conduct is alleged to not only violates Novo Nordisk’s policy, but also the Age Discrimination in Employment Act, which was passed by Congress in 1967.

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The statute prohibits discrimination against employees above the age of 40. Following an early attempt to achieve a pre-litigation settlement, the EEOC intervened by launching a case in New Jersey.

The suit seeks to “remedy and prevent the age discrimination in this case,” according to an EEOC statement on the lawsuit.

Novo Nordisk is far from the first pharmaceutical corporation to face an age discrimination lawsuit.

Two former Eli Lilly job applicants said in September the corporation “systematically disqualified” older candidates for diabetes and primary care sales roles in favor of younger staff, even though the older applicants were equally or more competent.

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In their lawsuit, the plaintiffs said Eli Lilly filled rep positions with interns until there were “no interns left.” This was allegedly in accordance with CEO David Ricks’ desire to increase the percentage of millennial sales representatives.

Novo Nordisk had not replied to Fierce Pharma’s request for comment at the time of publishing.

Source: Fiercepharma

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