Tesla is tracking its employees office attendance after CEO Elon Musk ordered staff back to work.

An employee shared an automated email from the company on the professional site Blind, which gave a staff member a warning for not using their badge to access a Tesla plant for “16 days of the last month.”

The email read: “This is an automated notification. You are receiving this email because there is no record of you using your badge to enter a Tesla facility on at least 16 days over the 30-day period ending on June 28. “

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“As a reminder, all employees are expected to be back in the office, fulltime.

“We realize that there are various reasons why you may not have badged in, including illness, vacation or traveling for business. 

“Whatever the case, please clear the reason for you absence with your manager by email, with a copy also sent to [email protected]

Another Blind post about Tesla said the new policy may have an effect on the company’s workers.

The employee wrote: “This feels wrong. I can’t quite put it into words why it bothers me, it feels like it’s an overstep. It’s controlling. It’s disrespectful.”

Musk has stated that the decision is part of an effort to foster equity between factory employees and executives since the former were compelled to work in person throughout the pandemic.

It was recently reported Tesla personnel were having trouble obtaining desk space and parking slots at Tesla’s Fremont facility, despite Musk’s call for the company’s nearly 100,000-person staff to return to work.

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The lack of space meant several supervisors instructed employees to come in fewer than five days per week, which contradicted Musk’s orders.

Tesla isn’t the first company to begin tracking staff sign-ins.

It was revealed reveal in April JPMorgan had started monitoring office attendance via “dashboards” and “reports.”

The organization utilized the data to impose return-to-office quotas, including calls and emails from managers to employees who were not achieving JPMorgan’s back to office standards.

Multiple employees claimed at the time that the new policy had caused them to look for work elsewhere.

Earlier this month, recruiters at large corporations like as Amazon and Microsoft began targeting Tesla employees on LinkedIn who could be opposed to Musk’s return-to-work order.

Tesla’s new policy comes after Musk announced intentions to lay off approximately 10 percent of paid employees due to fears about the future of the US economy.

Source: Insider

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