Employers in New York City are struggling to figure out what to do about looming salary-disclosure regulations and are hoping for a reprieve.

In less than a month, a sweeping pay-disclosure rule will take effect, mandating practically all companies operating in the city to provide pay scales on job advertisements.

Employers have been consulting attorneys on how to comply as the deadline approaches, defining wage ranges for each job title, and instructing managers on how to communicate the statistics to current employees.

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All at the same, business groups have worked to have the law delayed or changed before it goes into effect on Sunday, May 15.

An amendment to the law, proposed last month and revised in recent days, calls for implementation to be delayed until November.

Melissa Camire, a partner in the New York office of Fisher & Phillips LLP said: “Employers are trying to understand what this means and what their obligations are under this law.”

She is advising employers to take action now, even if the law is ultimately delayed. “May 15 is just a few weeks away, so you can’t ignore that may be the date you need to start doing this.”

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Kerry Moore, vice president of global talent and diversity at the company at the enterprise software company Workato, added: “Human-resources executives expect to spend the coming weeks meeting with employment attorneys for advice on things like what the law means for remote roles”

Ms. Moore believes that if Workato discloses pay while advertising jobs, it will most likely explain in the postings that a base salary is only one component of the company’s total compensation, which also includes bonuses and equity.

She added: “Another priority is preparing managers to answer questions from existing employees who might see published salary ranges on job postings and wonder why they aren’t at the top of a pay band themselves”

The law in New York, aimed at addressing gender pay disparities and increasing pay transparency, requires employers to disclose the expected salary range that an employer believes it would pay for each advertised job, promotion, or transfer opportunity.

It states that employers will not face civil penalties for their first violation of the rule and will have 30 days to correct the situation. It also limits the number of lawsuits that can be filed in relation to the law.

Source: WSJ

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