A fired Twitter engineer has filed a suit to the US labor board against the firm claiming he was illegally targeted because he helped other colleagues preserve email messages.

Emmanuel Cornet, an ex-Twitter software engineer says his attempts to help other employees preserve messages from their work email are the reason behind the dismissal.

In a filing with the National Labor Relations Board, Cornet said he was sacked on Tuesday, November 1.

READ MORE: FIRED TWITTER STAFF ASKED TO COME BACK AFTER BEING LAID OFF BY ELON MUSK

It was the same day he utilized a company Slack channel to share a Google Chrome extension he’d published. 

The feature was created to aid employees in preserving messages related to performance reviews or stock accumulation.

READ MORE: ELON MUSK COULD FIRE HALF OF THE TWITTER WORKFORCE

The tool might be beneficial for challenging layoffs or demanding compensation.

He says Twitter disabled the link to the Slack channel.

The NLRB filing states: “Mr. Cornet alleges that Twitter selected him to be one of the first employees let go in its mass layoff, in retaliation for having assisting his fellow employees to help protect themselves in the event that they were laid off.”

READ MORE: TWITTER EMPLOYEES SLEEPING AT WORK TO MEET ELON MUSK’S DEMANDS

Twitter did not immediately reply to a request for comment.

Statements filed with the NLRB are investigated by regional officials.

The agency has the jurisdiction to require firms to reinstate terminated employees and provide back pay.

But, it cannot typically hold executives personally accountable for suspected misconduct or issue exemplary damages.

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Cornet has also filed a class action lawsuit filed by the same attorney, Shannon Liss-Riordan, on Thursday, November 3.

He charged Twitter of breaching federal and state rules that require major corporations to provide months of advance notice before mass layoffs.

Musk stated that all employees who were let go were given three months of severance pay.

Liss-Riordan said Cornet was not guaranteed such compensation, and it is unclear which employees were.

Source: Bloomberg

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