Apple is facing charges for alleged discrimination against pro-union workers at a New York City store

The National Labor Relations Board has launched a lawsuit against the company accusing the tech giant of unlawfully questioning its retail workers over their union support and prohibiting pro-labor flyers in a store break room.

Apple was claimed of discriminating against workers by imposing its “no solicitation” policy primarily against employees who backed a union.

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The lawsuit was prompted by an earlier filing by the Communications Workers of America, which claimed Apple was stifling union organizing efforts.

The group highlighted alleged interrogations and curbs on flyers, along with claims that Apple compelled staff to attend anti-union talks.

However, Apple denied the allegations of anti-union tactics.

The company said: “We are fortunate to have incredible retail team members and we deeply value everything they bring to Apple. 

“We regularly communicate with our teams and always want to ensure everyone’s experience at Apple is the best it can be.”

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Apple’s retail chain, which has over 270 locations in the US, is facing unionization drives in a number of cities.

CWA has said that it is in contact with Apple employees across the country.

Employees in Oklahoma City will vote next week in an NLRB election to become the first Apple retail workers to join the union.

CWA’s secretary-treasurer, Sara Steffens, said: “It is past time for Apple’s senior management to respect its retail employees and stop its unlawful attempts to prevent them from forming unions.” 

In June, employees in Maryland voted in June to join the International Association of Machinists, another union.

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It is one of the most noticeable in a string of historic labor victories at major US corporations over the last year.

CWA also filed a still-pending NLRB action against Apple in Atlanta.

It claims that the labor group withdrew a petition for a unionization vote in May, noting the company’s alleged union-busting.

Complaints filed by labor board prosecutors are heard by administrative law judges, whose decisions can be appealed to NLRB members in Washington, and then to federal court.

Source: Bloomberg

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