An Apple employee could face disciplinary action for posting a TikTok video instructing viewers not to unlock stolen iPhones for thieves.

Paris Campbell, an Apple hardware engineer, became famous overnight after posting on TikTok in response to a video about a stolen iPhone.

The video explained the thieves make threats over the publication of personal information if she didn’t delete the Apple ID from the phone.

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But it goes on to say the user’s data is secure and not available to the thief.

She went on to explain the thieves want the ID removed so they can sell the phone quickly, rather than smashing it if it was kept locked.

Apple is a notoriously secretive firm and has regulations and standards that its workers must follow in order for the iPhone maker to keep its public image in check.

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Apple was not pleased with the apparent public service, according to Campbell, who claims she received a call from a manager on Friday instructing her to remove the video.

She claims she was threatened with disciplinary measures” up to and including termination” if she did not comply.

Apple’s social media policy for workers urges employees not to discuss Apple’s clients, other employees, or other private information on social media.

 However, it does not fully prohibit the discussion of publicly known technology.

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Employees are also apparently prohibited from disclosing that they work for Apple at all.

In the video, Campbell said: “For the previous six years, I’ve been a qualified hardware engineer for a specific corporation that loves to talk about fruit.

Campbell then posted a video called “Dear Apple,” which confirmed she was an Apple worker.

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The engineer is hopeful, though, as “after reviewing the social media policies nowhere does it say I can’t identify myself as an Apple employee publicly, just that I shouldn’t do so in a way that makes the company look bad.”

Campbell discovered Apple’s response to be “directly in contrast to how we portray ourselves as a company in terms of telling people to think different, innovate, and come up with creative solutions.”

She said: “I don’t just have all this Apple knowledge because I work for Apple.

“I come to this knowledge because I have a long technical education and history. That’s why they hired me.”

Apple has yet to comment on the situation.

Source: AppleInsider

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