Apple has been accused of violating labor laws at its iconic World Trade Center store in New York City.

The iPhone maker is accused of breaking federal labor rules by questioning employees about union activities, preventing employees from posting union leaflets in common areas, and compelling employees to attend anti-union speeches.

This is Apple’s second identical action, with similar lawsuits filed in Atlanta on Tuesday, May 17.

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These complaints are part of a series of unionization in the retail and technology industries, which includes the successful unionization of an Amazon warehouse in Staten Island.

So far, three Apple shops have formally begun union efforts, despite the fact that Apple does not presently have any retail unions in the United States.

The New York City labor lawsuit against Apple includes allegations that the company runs “captive audience” sessions, which are forced gatherings with anti-union themes.

Previously, such gatherings were permitted up to 24 hours before a union vote, but the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) recently modified its position, stating such captive audience meetings are coercive and a violation of federal labor law.

Although Apple has not publicly stated its position on unionization at its stores, it has sent anti-union talking lines to managers and engaged Littler Mendelson lawyers.

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Source: The Verge

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