More than 100,00 UK civil servants, including driving test examiners and Border Force staff, will go on strike as a row over pay, pensions and job cuts.

The Metro reports action will likely affect a wide range of government services, including benefit payments and passport control, as well as numerous government departments.

The strikes have been organised by the Public and Commercial Services union.

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General secretary Mark Serwotka said unless “substantial proposals” are received from the government over its concerns, further details of the walk-outs will be announced next week.

He said: “The government must look at the huge vote for strike action across swathes of the civil service and realise it can no longer treat its workers with contempt. 

“Our members have spoken and if the government fails to listen to them, we’ll have no option than to launch a prolonged programme of industrial action reaching into every corner of public life. 

“Civil servants have willingly and diligently played a vital role in keeping the country running during the pandemic but enough is enough. 

“The stress of working in the civil service, under the pressure of the cost-of-living crisis, job cuts and office closures means they’ve reached the end of their tethers. 

“We are calling on the government to respond positively to our members’ demands. They have to give our members a 10% pay rise, job security, pensions justice and protected redundancy terms.”

The threshold for action was reached in 126 areas of the civil servant workforce.

Energy regulator Ofgem, schools inspectorate Ofsted, the Charity Commission, the UK Health Security Agency and the Office for National Statistics are also affected.

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Mr Serwotka said the government must ‘realise it can no longer treat its workers with contempt’.

A government spokesman said: ‘We regret this decision and remain in regular discussion with unions and staff.’

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